Introduction

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Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Missing

    Mom has breast cancer. It's either Stg 1&2 (cuz they found another lump in other) or all same cancer at Stg 4. Her appts are just bad news more tests more appts....I don't know what to say to help her stay strong when I fear the worst?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    over 1 year ago 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      No words right now to her even have a meaning anywhere close to comfort. Comfort comes along the way as steps towards her treatment and survival are behind and she sees that she can do this, she is past that and that all the surgeries, dr appts, blood tests, chemo, radiation, hospital stays,...

      more

      No words right now to her even have a meaning anywhere close to comfort. Comfort comes along the way as steps towards her treatment and survival are behind and she sees that she can do this, she is past that and that all the surgeries, dr appts, blood tests, chemo, radiation, hospital stays, setbacks, etc etc is what comfort will now mean to her. You can comfort her by reading everything you can about breast cancer, surgery options, reconstruction options, what blood counts should be, are the benefits of a mastectomy vs lumpectomy worth all the additional surgeries etc as far of her chances of cancer returning or staying cancer free... You get the picture it's just a lot of live and learn as u go and if you'd like to talk offline email me your number to kathycrum1@aol.com

      Comment
    • anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I guess I don't understand if she has breast cancer found in both breasts and what are the stages? 1, 2, and 4? At the point of diagnosis, it is pretty confusing because you actually won't get the final diagnosis until after her surgery is done and the report comes back from the pathologist. ...

      more

      I guess I don't understand if she has breast cancer found in both breasts and what are the stages? 1, 2, and 4? At the point of diagnosis, it is pretty confusing because you actually won't get the final diagnosis until after her surgery is done and the report comes back from the pathologist. My stage changed after the surgery because one of my nodes had cancer in it.
      At this point, there is a ton of testing.... she will have lots of bloodwork, and possibly CT Scan, PET Scan, MRI, MUGA.... and MORE bloodwork. Keep a copy of all of her tests in a 3 ring binder, tape all of the business cards taped on the inside of cover. When you go with her take tons of notes, or audio tape her consultation appointments.
      At this point, you are just trying to get through all the preliminary testing. Once you get a treatment plan, at least her path will be a bit clearer. Believe it or not, you actually get a feeling of comfort and security from hearing your treatment plan. She will probably have surgery, either lumpectomy or mastectomy, chemotherapy, and maybe radiation. If her tumor is larger, she may have some chemo treatment before surgery to shrink the tumor. I wouldn't get wrapped up in the drama of "What her chances are?" She just puts on her woman warrior gear and goes into battle. We here on this site are either going through treatment or have been through treatment. I had breast cancer 5 years ago and am alive, well, and enjoying the heck out of my life. There are LOTS of options for treatment of all sorts of breast cancers. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Missing

    what does P2 mean?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    7 months ago 2 answers
    • anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      What is it in regard to?

      Comment
    • anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Just saw it on my notes when the doctor gave them over before my mammogram. It stated P2. Just wondered what that meant. Had a mammogram on Thur and not heard of the results as of yet. I am assuming that they would have got back to me by now if it was anything serious.

      1 comment
  • Missing

    my grandmother past away from breast cancer am i at high risk my grand mother was my moms mom

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 1 year ago 2 answers
    • anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      You are probably at higher risk than someone who has zero family history. That wasn't my case though. No history for me, I still got it. Just be vigilant about changes or unusual things going on with your body. Go to the dr for regular exams. But don't live in fear that you may get it. God bless.

      Comment
    • anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I agree with Jennifer. Cancer is sneaky though. My maternal grandmother had breast cancer in her late 70's. I was diagnosed at 52 with it. Be diligent with self exams and mammos and report any changes you notice to your MD.

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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